Home Dialogue

"One Hundred Questions, 
One Hundred Answers"

Dialogue

You can ask your questions to Armenia's First Minister of Foreign Affairs Raffi Hovannisian.

Կարող եք Ձեր հարցերն ուղղել Հայաստանի առաջին արտգործնախարար Րաֆֆի Հովհաննիսյանին:

 


"One Hundred Questions,
 One Hundred Answers

Dialogue
The Civilitas Foundation cordially invites you
to the next discussion in the series:
"One Hundred Questions,

One Hundred Answers


"

This month's guest is
Pargev Ohanyan
Former Judge

Discussion is moderated by
Aram Abrahamyan
Editor-in-Chief of Aravot Daily



The event will take place at the

Golden Tulip Hotel Yerevan, Rossini Hall,

on Wednesday, March 7 at 2 p.m.


To confirm your participation,

please call 010 500-119.

Number of places is limited.
Simultaneous translation will be provided.
You can post your questions ahead of time.
 

"One Hundred Questions, One Hundred Answers"

Dialogue

You can ask your questions to Former Judge  Pargev Ohanyan.

Կարող եք Ձեր հարցերն ուղղել նախկին դատավոր Պարգև Օհանյանին:

 



"One Hundred Questions, 
One Hundred Answers"



Dialogue

You can ask your questions to the Former Armenian Minister of Foreign Affairs Alexander Arzumanyan.

Կարող եք Ձեր հարցերն ուղղել Հայաստանի նախկին արտգործնախարար Ալեքսանդր Արզումանյանին:

 

One Hundred Questions, One Hundred Answers

Dialogue

You can ask your questions to the former U.S. Ambassador to Armenia John Marshall Evans.

Կարող եք Ձեր հարցերն ուղղել Հայաստանում ԱՄՆ նախկին դեսպան, Ջոն Մարշալ Էվանսին:

 

Q&A: Which spheres require urgent reforms

Dialogue
Our last question was, "Which spheres require urgent reforms?" We suggested a few spheres to focus on: the political system, the economic system, the judicial system, education and mass media. Typically, we receive a similar distribution of answers on both the Armenian and English Civilitas sites.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The economic crisis is over, will be over soon, or will not be over in the near future

Dialogue
Our previous survey asked whether the economic crisis is over, will be over soon, or will not be over in the near future.
Out of the participants who responded, 80 percent think the economic crisis will not be over in the near future.  Almost 12 percent think it will be over soon, and about 8.5 percent think the crisis is over.
According to official statistics, there was a 7.2 percent increase in GDP between the months of January-April when compared to the same period last year. 

Read more...

 

Q&A: Would a severe punishment for slander and libel improve media quality?

Dialogue
Our previous question was: Would a severe punishment for slander and libel improve media quality? Fifty percent think it will not change the situation, while 43 percent believe that it will.

Read more...

 

Q&A: Do you believe that free elections (one where even an incumbent can be defeated) can change a country?

Dialogue

Our previous question was: "Do you believe that free elections (one where even an incumbent can be defeated) can change a country?"

Opinions were mostly divided. Of those who answered the question, 53% thought that such elections could bring positive change to the country; 43% thought they could not. Around 4% did not have an answer.

Read more...

 

Q&A: Do you see the future of your children in Armenia?

Dialogue

Our previous question was: "Do you see the future of your children in Armenia?"

84 of those who participated in the poll said "No", 67 said "Yes". We also had a similar discussion on our Facebook Generation Center page. Some of the participants said "Yes," some said "No," but it seems like most agree that the Armenia we have now, no matter how patriotic we are, no matter how much we love our country, which we have no doubt you do, still raises serious concerns when it comes to deciding weather this is the place we believe can be the best place for our children.

Read more...

 

Q&A: Opening of Armenia -Turkey border or Improving the domestic economic and political environment

Dialogue

In our previous poll, we asked which would be of greater benefit to Armenia's economy , opening of Armenia -Turkey border or Improving the domestic economic and political environment . Before proceeding to discussion of the poll results, a little bit about the poll itself. One of the respondents asked whether the choices contradict each another, or if it is not possible to implement both simultaneously.

Read more...

 

Q&A: Assessing Armenia-Turkey Protocols

Dialogue
Our previous question was – how do you assess the Armenia-Turkey protocols?
Approximately 70 percent of respondents were negative in their assessment, 26 percent positive, and two percent had no opinion. We don’t pretend that these polls are sociologically accurate. But we do believe they reflect the public’s and our oft-stated concerns about the preconditions which have been included in those protocols and which are unacceptable for the Armenian side. Other publicized, sociological surveys have produced similar results.
Concerns or outright opposition to these protocols should not be viewed as opposition to improved relations or open borders between Armenia and Turkey.  Normalization between neighbors is the only normal way to coexist.
However, these protocols don’t take us to normal. They display no readiness to let history be. It lacks the courage to acknowledge the past and move forward. The protocol’s call for “an impartial scientific examination” under government auspices is an invitation to formalize the acrimony.
The unusual expectation about ‘recognizing existing borders’ is also no way to begin a normal relationship, especially after two provisions which assure a respect for each other’s territorial integrity. Finally, the daily pronouncements of top Turkish leaders confirm fears.
In conclusion then, as Turkish President Abdullah Gul said to a French journalist who asked whether questions about the facts and veracity of the Armenian Genocide were not already on the record, “No, of course.” So, our readers and we, too, believe the correct response is, “No, of course,” to the protocols in their current form.

Our previous question was – how do you assess the Armenia-Turkey protocols?

Approximately 70 percent of respondents were negative in their assessment, 26 percent positive, and two percent had no opinion. We don’t pretend that these polls are sociologically accurate. But we do believe they reflect the public’s and our oft-stated concerns about the preconditions which have been included in those protocols and which are unacceptable for the Armenian side. Other publicized, sociological surveys have produced similar results.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Expediency of the President's Visit to Turkey

Dialogue
Our last question was: “If on the day of the FIFA Armenia-Turkey football game, the border is closed, regardless of whatever promises are made, should the Armenian president go to the game”?

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Importance of Wearing a Pin

Dialogue

 

Previously, we asked, “Should the president still be wearing the pin of his political party?” This question created a great deal of interest. Of those who voted, 67 percent believe that the president should not wear his party’s pin, because he is the president of the entire nation, not only of one political party. Another 29 percent or 218 respondents believe that it does not matter; three percent believe he has a right to wear such a lapel pin.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Causes of Armenia's Economic Crisis

Dialogue

Last time we asked, “What has a greater impact on Armenia’s economic crisis,” acknowledging of course that both the international crisis as well as the economic policies of the government do have a huge role to play. Nearly half agreed that the problem is indeed caused by both. However, just over a third of respondents put greater responsibility (or blame) on the government than on the international crisis.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Importance of Open Borders

Dialogue
When nearly half of a random sample of respondents say that the opening of the Turkish-Armenian border is harmful to Armenia, and the other half say it’s important or very important, it is clear that this unreal state has become the norm.

There is not and has not been a war between the republics of Armenia and Turkey, yet the border has been closed for 15 years. This is the only such case in the world. There are as we’ve often said countless other pairs of countries, neighbors, with great problems and disagreements between them, yet their common border remains open.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Significance of Devaluation

Dialogue

Most of you (92) agreed that the Dram devaluation which took place on March 3 is generally a good thing for Armenia’s economy.
Thirty one of you disagreed. We imagine part of the No vote was because of the way it was done, and not specifically opposition to the devaluation. It is true that the sudden announcement by the IMF, that Armenia had agreed to a more flexible currency exchange policy, after weeks of denial that such a move is either necessary or imminent, caused panic and cynicism among a population already suffering from the economic downturn.

Read more...

 

Q&A: The Usefulness of Intervention

Dialogue

We asked: Should the government seek to intervene and protect Armenia’s production and bail out some important industries which are in trouble, like mining?

Twenty-six of you said no; 104 said yes. There were eight I don’t knows, but the majority clearly felt government intervention is a good thing.

This overwhelming yes can be interpreted in various ways, as can the minority No vote. Did you vote no because you don’t believe intervention is necessary? Or is the mining sector not the one worthy of support? Finally, how many voted no because they believed that intervention is indeed necessary, but not just at a time of crisis?

 

Read more...

 
Civilitas Blog

The Civilitas Community shares stories about daily challenges and successes. Today: Lost in Istanbul

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Inside Civilitas

A day by day look at the investigation by the National Security Service into Civilitas's financial and administrative work.

Chronology
Civilitas Statement
National Security Service Statement
The Political Context
Transaction Summary

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The objective of the project is to contribute to the overall improvement of dairy production practices in Armenia by providing machinery to dairy farmers for increasing their productivity and income and improving their living standards.
The objective of the project is to contribute to the overall improvement of dairy production practices in Armenia by providing machinery to dairy farmers for increasing their productivity and income and improving their living standards.
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With the support of Norwegian and German governments, a few months ago the Civilitas Foundation began to conduct polls throughout Armenia. The results of the polls will be made available to the media and will serve as the topic of public discussions.

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Civilitas Spotlight

 

What can be expected of or for Syria in the immediate future? Can there be justice without peace? Can there be peace without an accounting and without justice? What do Syrians want? What does the international community want?

The guests are

Nicholas Koumjian

International Criminal Law Attorney

Vartan Oskanian

Member of Parliament

Former Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

 
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Civil.am
Civil.am - your guide to civil society activity in Armenia - is a project of the Civilitas Foundation. Take a closer look to better understand what is already being done. Identify potential partners and cooperation possibilities. Support existing programs to increase efficiency. Encourage new programs to foster development.
 
Facts for Thought
Number of theater performances (1) and attendance (2) in Armenia
(1) (2)
2008 2,364 409,500
2009 2,443 367,800
2010 2,331 394,800
2011 2,707 458,900
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