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The Civilitas Foundation initiates, executes and backs projects which facilitate, support sustainable, comprehensive and even development in Armenia's villages, enabling villagers to live a self-reliant, dignified life in Armenia's border areas. From small social and economic undertakings to larger infrastructure projects, the Foundation will work with donors and implementors to assure an inclusive, comprehensive approach.

The Foundation has two program areas: The first is the Council on International Relations and the other is the Democracy and Development Initiative. Both aim to do the same thing: provide mechanisms, forums, resources to better inform and support our people, to strengthen civil society, all for the purpose of strengthening our state.

Civil society does not stop with our cities. And our work does not stop with conferences and information dissemination in Yerevan. Our rural residents too must become active in civil processes. But village residents cannot be active members of civil society unless they are first able to live self-reliant lives, in dignity, able to support themselves and their families. In our country, with our limited external markets, and our decayed infrastructure, only by offering villagers the specific and specialized support that they need, will they become self-sufficient. That is what Civilitas does.

But simply renovating infrastructure is insufficient. The village community must be earning an income, supporting families and also paying for the renovated infrastructure – roads, water, gas – so they continue to receive those services. Therefore, at the Civilitas Foundation, we are focusing on comprehensive human development, beginning with economic development. We too are working with generous donors – the Swiss Development Corporation, the Ekcerciyan Family in Argentina, the Iranian-Armenian community and others – to offer support to farmers so that they can be more productive, reach their markets, and sell their products so that they can be self-supporting, and lead dignified lives.

The economic component of our program focuses on rural areas. There are already a significant number of large companies and our farmers have an accessible, immediate, ready market. Our program directly helps the villagers to produce more, sell more, earn more. And most important, our programs are designed to engage the village communities so that the program becomes sustainable over time, without our participation. Our purpose is to not pass out charity, but to show the villager the way to become self-reliant. In other words, while cleaning, renovating and maintaining a water distribution system, which is one of our projects in Meghri, the challenge is to develop the social and organizational capacity to develop a communal system where the community is responsible and able to keep the system clean and functioning.

It is difficult, if not nearly impossible, to speak about the formation of a civil society when the members of that society cannot meet their minimal daily needs. People must be able to satisfy their basic economic needs before they can become active members of society.

One family at a time, one village at a time, Civilitas is working to increase capacity, increase productivity, improve self-reliance and nurture economic development. At the end of the day, this means a healthier, self-sufficient society. Our programs focus on helping villages become better organized. Villagers must become convinced that by working together they can meet the needs of their village themselves, and not wait for the next election to see who will be passing out a few thousand Dram. This is a complex, long-term challenge, but we must work village by village to realize this, otherwise we’ll never have the kind of civil society which we all want and need.
 
Civilitas Blog

The Civilitas Community shares stories about daily challenges and successes. Today: Lost in Istanbul

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Inside Civilitas

A day by day look at the investigation by the National Security Service into Civilitas's financial and administrative work.

Chronology
Civilitas Statement
National Security Service Statement
The Political Context
Transaction Summary

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Civilitas Library
The Civilitas Foundation Library -- a collection of political, historic and philosophical works -- open to all who need it. Do you want to donate a volume?
See the Civilitas Amazon wish list.
Our Projects
LIBRARIES AS CENTERS OF CIVIL SOCIETY
The main objective of the project is to support and strengthen the public libraries in a number of rural and urban communities in Armenia, away from the capital, in order to transform them into true centers of community life providing a number of services to the population.

Civilitas Around the Web
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Civilitas Polls
With the support of Norwegian and German governments, a few months ago the Civilitas Foundation began to conduct polls throughout Armenia. The results of the polls will be made available to the media and will serve as the topic of public discussions.

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Civilitas Spotlight

 

What can be expected of or for Syria in the immediate future? Can there be justice without peace? Can there be peace without an accounting and without justice? What do Syrians want? What does the international community want?

The guests are

Nicholas Koumjian

International Criminal Law Attorney

Vartan Oskanian

Member of Parliament

Former Minister of Foreign Affairs

 

 
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Civil.am
Civil.am - your guide to civil society activity in Armenia - is a project of the Civilitas Foundation. Take a closer look to better understand what is already being done. Identify potential partners and cooperation possibilities. Support existing programs to increase efficiency. Encourage new programs to foster development.
 
Facts for Thought
Number of theater performances (1) and attendance (2) in Armenia
(1) (2)
2008 2,364 409,500
2009 2,443 367,800
2010 2,331 394,800
2011 2,707 458,900
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